Yukon Weekly

Saturday, September 24, 2022

A new scam alert has been issued by the Canadian border agency

A new scam alert has been issued by Canada's border agency

Key Takeaways:

  • Scammers are posing as CBSA officials are requesting money and personal information such as social security numbers via emails, websites, text messages, and phone calls, according to the agency.
  • According to the CBSA, Canadians should ignore such calls and messages and instead report them to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre.

A new scam warning has been issued by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).

According to the agency, scammers posing as CBSA officials are asking for money and personal information such as social security numbers via emails, websites, text messages, and phone calls.

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The CBSA warned in a press release that “the scammers’ methods and messages are varied as well as ever, but always crafted to demand money and also lure the public into providing personal data.” “Calls may display counts and employee names that show up to be from the CBSA but are not.” To deceive the public, emails may contain CBSA logos, email addresses, or employee names and titles.”

The CBSA says it will never ask for a social insurance or credit card number by phone or email.

“It is a scam if an individual receives a phone call or an email from the CBSA requesting this data or requesting payments,” the CBSA stated.

A new scam alert has been issued by Canada's border agency
A new scam alert has been issued by Canada’s border agency. Image from Kimberley Daily Bulletin

Canadians should ignore such calls and messages and instead report them to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre, according to the CBSA.

Fake ArriveCan and Electronic Travel Authorization websites and apps are also being warned about by the CBSA (eTA). ArriveCan is a free govt platform that allows visitors to share information before as well as after arriving in Canada. Most tourists must pay a $7 electronic travel authorization (eTA) fee to enter Canada, with the oddity of U.S. passport holders.

More data on these types of scams can be found on the CBSA webpage and the Canadian Revenue Agency’s “Scams as well as fraud” page.

Source: CTV News

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