Yukon Weekly

Lyme disease affects or has affected 14.5 % of the world’s population

Lyme disease affects or has affected 14.5 % of the world's population.

Key Takeaways:

  • Antibodies to Lyme disease were discovered in the blood of more than 14% of the global population, according to a study published in the peer-reviewed journal BMJ Global Health.
  • The data revealed a 14.5 percent global seroprevalence for Lyme disease infection, which is defined as the presence of antibodies in the blood.
  • The use of an analytical technique known as Western blotting, according to the study’s authors, could greatly improve antibody detection accuracy.

According to a recent study, more than one-tenth of the world’s population has or has had tick-borne Lyme disease.

According to a study published in the peer-reviewed journal BMJ Global Health, antibodies to Lyme disease were discovered in the blood of more than 14% of the global population.

According to the study, certain regions in Europe and Asia have the highest incidence of Lyme disease, with men 50 and older living in rural areas being the most vulnerable.

However, according to the experts, further study is needed to increase the accuracy of worldwide estimations.

Also read: Alberta is getting rid of pandemic laws like mandatory isolation

The report finds, “LB (Lyme borreliosis) is a widely spread infectious disease that has gotten little attention internationally.”

The authors claim that predicting when as well as where there will be an infection risk is a big public health concern, but that better describing worldwide distribution will aid epidemiology and uncover disease risk factors.

Lyme disease is spread by tick bites and varies from person to person, sometimes showing up later without any warning signs or symptoms.

A spreading skin rash that resembles a target or “bull’s eye” is a typical Lyme disease symptom.

Fever, chills, weariness, headache, swollen lymph nodes, and muscle and joint aches are some of the other early signs and symptoms.

An infection can spread to the joints, heart, and nervous system if left untreated, but early detection and treatment can help prevent future issues.

According to the study’s authors, lyme disease has continued to spread over the world, but there is disagreement about how widespread it is globally.

The researchers looked through databases and found 4,196 studies published between January 1984 through December 2021, of which they reviewed 137.

They then compiled data from 89 trials with a total of 158,287 participants.

The findings revealed a global seroprevalence of 14.5 percent for Lyme disease infection, defined as the presence of antibodies in the blood.

Lyme disease affects or has affected 14.5 % of the world's population.
Lyme disease affects or has affected 14.5 % of the world’s population. Image from Geo.tv

Central Europe had the highest percentage, at almost 21%, followed by eastern Asia at roughly 16%, Western Europe at 13.5 percent, and eastern Europe at 10.4 percent.

The Caribbean (two percent), southern Asia (three percent), and Oceania (one percent) had the lowest rates (4.1 percent).

North and South America rates were 9.4% and 8.7%, respectively.

According to the study’s authors, adopting an analytical technique called Western blotting could dramatically boost antibody detection accuracy.

Men 50 and older who lived in rural regions and were bitten by a tick had a higher likelihood of harboring antibodies, according to a smaller study of 58 studies using this method.

According to the study, infection rates in 2010-21 were also higher on average than in 2001-10.

They believe this is due to longer summers, warmer winters, reduced rainfall, animal migration, human-caused fragmentation of arable land and forest cover, and humans spending more time outside with pets.

The researchers said their conclusions are limited by the lack of long-term studies in their analyses.

The researchers say they could not identify whether antibody positivity influences the chance of contracting Lyme disease or recurrence in the long run since most of the papers did not specify high-risk categories in their investigations.

Source: CTV News

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